Review: Navman MiVUE680

, posted: 14-Sep-2016 00:07

There’s a competition on Geekzone to win this review unit. Click here to enter.

Dashcams are not normally a product that I’d review, however when the opportunity came up to do some stunt driving, including a ridiculously tight parallel park, an attempt to jump the car over a ramp, then the actual jump (footage here from outside the car as another perspective), the inner boy-racer in me couldn’t resist.

I think dashcams are going to become more standard in cars as the technology matures.  If you’ve ever been involved in an accident, having the actual video footage to help with the police investigation and inevitable insurance claim is gold.  Witness evidence can be debated and argued with; you can’t really dispute the facts when you have the video.

The MiVUE680 is a small unit with a 2.7 inch screen on the back (not touch screen) and a wide angle lens capable of 2K full HD video (the MiVUE698 Dual Cam comes with a rear camera as well).  Anyone who’s had a Navman GPS unit will already be familiar with the suction cup mount; the stiff design makes for a secure mount, and not for regular removal of the unit.  It is small enough to mount up behind the rear view mirror, and is supplied with a very long cable for charging via the car’s 12V supply (aka cigarette lighter).  Recordings are saved to a microSD card (not supplied).

The most important thing is how do the recordings look?  Below are samples from both day and night driving in Auckland.

As you drive, the dashcam is constantly recording.  Each file lasts around 3 minutes and is 320MB – with the 8GB microSD card I was provided, that’s around an hour and 15 minutes worth of continuous recording time in total.

Event recording is triggered when there’s a sudden impact, or you’re driving at high speed, make an aggressive turn or something else that triggers the G sensor.  While the constant recording can be overwritten as you keep driving, the event recording is moved to it’s own separate folder on the SD card.  You can also trigger this manually by pushing a button on the side.

The dashcam has lots of other safety features other than video recording which include:

  • Warns you when you are near a fixed speed camera
  • Lane detection warnings
  • Reminders to turn your headlights on if you haven’t
  • Reminders to take regular breaks when driving for long periods of time
  • Warning if you get too close to the car ahead
  • Warning if the car in front of you has moved off and you are still stopped

It’s a great little unit which you could easily install then forget about it.  My two issues with it are minor: it should be touch screen, and I felt the buttons down the right hand side were too far away from the indications on the screen, making them hard to match up.

My thanks again to Navman for hosting me and providing a unit for review.

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I'm Nate Dunn, and I work for 3Bit, own Tuihana Cafe, and am a moderator here at Geekzone.

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The views and opinions represented on this blog are personal and belong solely to the blogger and do not represent in anyway those of 3Bit Solutions Limited or any other company.

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